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Electric heating and hot water system advice


Highland29

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Looking for a bit of advice about electric heating and hot water systems.

I'm looking at replacing the heating system in my house and was recently advised to install a new electric heating and hot water system. Has anybody done this recently? Any recommendations?

Any and all advice (helpful) is greatly appreciated.

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Looking for a bit of advice about electric heating and hot water systems.

I'm looking at replacing the heating system in my house and was recently advised to install a new electric heating and hot water system. Has anybody done this recently? Any recommendations?

Any and all advice (helpful) is greatly appreciated.

Depends how big your house is and how much you want to spend. Combi's are big at the moment but if you're bigger than a 3 bedroom house they maybe lack a bit of 'oomph' depending on your mains pressure.

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Thanks for reply.

Just bought a 2 bedroom house last year (would have bought bigger but lost £40k on last house - dam market crash)

Combis relatively good on running costs?

A wee thought, combis do away with your boiler so no hot water storage. Any lecky faults, power cuts etc and you have no hot water.

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Thanks for reply.

Just bought a 2 bedroom house last year (would have bought bigger but lost £40k on last house - dam market crash)

Combis relatively good on running costs?

You can probably get one for a bit over 2K and its more or less instant hot water, as Tom McB says, if you get an electrical failure then no hot water but I guess you're days off to a shit start anyway if you wake up without lecky. Combi's are good with radiators and in a two bedroom job they'll do everything you need and they don't take up a lot of space either. Have a look online at your options for cost and get a few heating engineers round for quotes and suggestions, a decent one will go through your best options.

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If it's a 2 bedroom then providing your water supply is good enough then a decent Combi should be fine. If you find later that combi does not suit your needs then you could upgrade to an unvented hot water system. You can just use the water side of the combi to feed your kitchen sink and with a little bit of alterations to the pipework it can also be used to heat the rest of the hot water in the unvented system.

Don't go for an electric boiler to heat your radiators as no matter what you are told it is expensive to run.

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Electric heating is only really viable as a last resort if there is absolutely no way of fitting a gas or oil fired system. Options are fairly limited too as there isn't as big market for them.

I've only fitted one electric boiler after 13 years in trade. I do realise that sometimes its the only option though.

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Electric heating is only really viable as a last resort if there is absolutely no way of fitting a gas or oil fired system. Options are fairly limited too as there isn't as big market for them.

I've only fitted one electric boiler after 13 years in trade. I do realise that sometimes its the only option though.

^^^^

This man knows what he's talking about. Remember electricity is about 3 to 4 times more expensive that gas per kW.

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Have you looked at air-source heat pumps? If the alternatives are oil or electric, you should consider it.

Depending on the property and insulation you'd be looking at 300-400% efficiency compared to an electric boiler's 100%.

Air source heat pumps are fine if you live in a temperate climate, however the payback is relative to the input/output ratio.

If you stay in Cornwall the payback will be better than if you stay in Caithness.

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Air source heat pumps are fine if you live in a temperate climate, however the payback is relative to the input/output ratio.

If you stay in Cornwall the payback will be better than if you stay in Caithness.

The property is more important than the location. Of course theoretically a house in Cornwall will perform better than an identical house in Caithness.

If installed properly air-cource heat pumps are a perfectly adequate option for Scotland. I've been using one for 5 and a half years with no problems.

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The property is more important than the location. Of course theoretically a house in Cornwall will perform better than an identical house in Caithness.

If installed properly air-cource heat pumps are a perfectly adequate option for Scotland. I've been using one for 5 and a half years with no problems.

What is your location and what is your Kw input to Kw output pay back?

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What is your location and what is your Kw input to Kw output pay back?

I'm in NE Fife and my system returns a COP of around 3.5 (it is metered electrically but not thermally so I'm going by the heat loss assessment of my house), but my property isn't ideal for it. New builds running the same system achieve well over 4.0 easily, particularly on the Western Isles & Orkney.

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