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Assisted Death


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in cases like this and in cases where there is great suffering and where the person is terminally ill  yes , each case should be considered on their own though, I do not believe in a blanket legalisation , in truth though assisted dying happens in hospitals everywhere but not on the patients terms  .

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Would not be keen on this being legalised. Could lead to situations where frail and infirm are pressured into taking this option because they are a "burden on families or society". 

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28 minutes ago, mathematics said:

Yes and yes, if Westminster will allow them.

 

I believe this is a matter that the Scottish Parliament could legislate on.

I agree with whereismillar that there shouldn't be blanket legislation and that each case would have to be considered on its own merits.

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11 minutes ago, ICTJohnboy said:

 

I believe this is a matter that the Scottish Parliament could legislate on.

I agree with whereismillar that there shouldn't be blanket legislation and that each case would have to be considered on its own merits.

heraldrangersrip.jpg

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I have worked in healthcare for nearly a decade and have watched many people die slowly and horribly of terminal illnesses and degenerative conditions.

I would support this if it enabled individuals with terminal and degenerative conditions to die on their own terms in their own home.

Terminal and degenerative conditions often rob people of their independence and destroy their quality of life to the extent were they end up unable to do anything for themselves, in terrible pain and often lying in their own waste just waiting to die. Is that a death you would chose? Why not let terminally ill people choose to be assisted to die on their own terms?

However, this will never be a reality because it would mean less money for big private companies.

9 minutes ago, Jute said:

Would not be keen on this being legalised. Could lead to situations where frail and infirm are pressured into taking this option because they are a "burden on families or society". 

Unfortunately it's already possible to get someone "out of the way", and it does happen. People who possess legal guardianship over someone who is registered as an Adult With Incapacity can make decisions regarding their treatment, including refusal of treatment. It's morally very wrong but perfectly legal.

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15 minutes ago, Jute said:

Would not be keen on this being legalised. Could lead to situations where frail and infirm are pressured into taking this option because they are a "burden on families or society". 

Any legislation would not include the "elderly" or "infirm".

You won't be able to take this option just because you are old.

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in cases like this and in cases where there is great suffering and where the person is terminally ill  yes , each case should be considered on their own though, I do not believe in a blanket legalisation , in truth though assisted dying happens in hospitals everywhere but not on the patients terms  .


What do you mean by blanket legislation?

I would have thought it was obvious, to the point of not needing brought up, that each case would be considered on its own merits.
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23 minutes ago, Romeo said:

Any legislation would not include the "elderly" or "infirm".

You won't be able to take this option just because you are old.

 

You mean we could be stuck with Granny Danger on this forum for some time to come yet?

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15 minutes ago, oneteaminglasgow said:

 


What do you mean by blanket legislation?

I would have thought it was obvious, to the point of not needing brought up, that each case would be considered on its own merits.

 

Better using a pillow.

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49 minutes ago, oneteaminglasgow said:

 


What do you mean by blanket legislation?

I would have thought it was obvious, to the point of not needing brought up, that each case would be considered on its own merits.

 

nothing is obvious , depends on your point of view, any decision if any would need to be carefully considered . all opinions need considered .

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3 hours ago, Jute said:

Would not be keen on this being legalised. Could lead to situations where frail and infirm are pressured into taking this option because they are a "burden on families or society". 

That's why I support it.

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4 hours ago, Jute said:

Would not be keen on this being legalised. Could lead to situations where frail and infirm are pressured into taking this option because they are a "burden on families or society". 

That is the key issue for me.

I have had a couple of family members/family friends who have died with terrible long term illnesses where really, especially knowing the persons nature, they would rather have been dead a lot sooner.  However I could imagine my own mum, god forbid, wanting to take this option a lot sooner than she should in order to decrease the upset she could be causing her children or grandchildren.  

Its a really difficult subject.

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4 hours ago, whereismillar said:

in cases like this and in cases where there is great suffering and where the person is terminally ill  yes , each case should be considered on their own though, I do not believe in a blanket legalisation , in truth though assisted dying happens in hospitals everywhere but not on the patients terms  .

There’s another thread for this...

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8 hours ago, Jute said:

Would not be keen on this being legalised. Could lead to situations where frail and infirm are pressured into taking this option because they are a "burden on families or society". 

That's a reasonable concern. But does the risk of it really reach the level where it gives the government the right to tell me what I can and can't do with my own body?

The risks of people popping themselves off before they really want to is outweighed by the certainty of forcing large numbers of people to suffer needlessly. 

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Yes people who have terminal conditions and see their standard of life deteriorate to the point of becoming a vegetable, should have the right to determine whether they wish to live or not.

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