Jump to content

A Photographic History Of Scottish Football


Recommended Posts

A smoke bomb temporarily halts play between Celtic and Hearts in 1987, a rare occurrence then pyro at games but now happens at games umpteen times each week at matches at all levels. 

This was a pivotal result for Celtic on the way to a centenary season double, Hearts, whom many people probably won't remember finished second behind Celtic, splitting the 'Old Firm', were leading 2-0 with ten minutes to go at Celtic Park that day, a penalty by Andy Walker and a bullet finish from the maestro Paul McStay in the closing minutes meant this was most definitely a point gained, I remember it specifically as the date, 12th December 1987 was my 11th birthday. 

20230915_203835.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 08/11/2022 at 07:05, Dundee Hibernian said:

Scotland, 1958, Sunday names:

From left to right, (back row) John Davidson Hewie, Eric Caldow, Thomas Younger, Edward Hunter Turnbull, Robert Evans and Douglas Cowie; 
(front row) Graham Leggat, James Murray, John Knight Mudie, Robert Young Collins and James John Stewart Imlach.

1958.thumb.jpg.f90b15245c5de70c7be90daed9ffa95f.jpg

Posting this to mention the book written by Gary Imlach, Stewart's son. His book 'My father and Other Working Class Heroes' has been around for quite a while, 2005, but recently read it and would say it's one of the best football books ever written.

Just finished it. Outstanding.

 

This passage in the last chapter :

“Of course, the idea of clubs as friendly societies, functioning for the benefit of the fan, never existed outside cloth-capped, moist-eyed myth. Yet somehow it had been easier to suspend disbelief when the whole pantomime was a more modest, low-budget production; the villain a fat local butcher or car dealer, the players living up the road, not on another plane of existence altogether as they were now. The tacitly agreed fictions that had sustained the illusion of football as some sort of community, albeit a flawed one, seem to have been a function of style. They couldn’t survive enlargement. And, engorged as it it is with money, the game was now very large indeed.”  😚👌

Edited by Luddite
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Luddite said:

Just finished it. Outstanding.

 

This passage in the last chapter :

“Of course, the idea of clubs as friendly societies, functioning for the benefit of the fan, never existed outside cloth-capped, moist-eyed myth. Yet somehow it had been easier to suspend disbelief when the whole pantomime was a more modest, low-budget production; the villain a fat local butcher or car dealer, the players living up the road, not on another plane of existence altogether as they were now. The tacitly agreed fictions that had sustained the illusion of football as some sort of community, albeit a flawed one, seem to have been a function of style. They couldn’t survive enlargement. And, engorged as it it is with money, the game was now very large indeed.”  😚👌

And yet, @Luddite, I hark back to those days, a few years on. Maybe what I'd like for football is to go somewhat foreward from that point, but to stick in the 'seventies.... for the rest of my days.

Clearly that hasn't or can't happen, I feel like the game for me as a fan is being directed rather than a matter of choice. 

Yet that paragraph emphasises the leaches in football at that point, and they still exist (but much, much worse to my mind) today. 

Here's Stewart Imlach.

StewartImlach.jpg.d1e3d3e38cda5350c88d11f4c5a3c760.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Dundee Hibernian said:

And yet, @Luddite, I hark back to those days, a few years on. Maybe what I'd like for football is to go somewhat foreward from that point, but to stick in the 'seventies.... for the rest of my days.

Clearly that hasn't or can't happen, I feel like the game for me as a fan is being directed rather than a matter of choice. 

Yet that paragraph emphasises the leaches in football at that point, and they still exist (but much, much worse to my mind) today. 

Here's Stewart Imlach.

StewartImlach.jpg.d1e3d3e38cda5350c88d11f4c5a3c760.jpg

 

Do you watch with a level of cognitive dissonance (as described by Gary Imlach above)?

Ive only started watching football again recently after almost 10 yrs avoiding it, but to stop myself ranting the whole time I mainly watch league one/two (and the occasional Championship match). I avoid as much of the high-level modern twattery as I can (some of which I see even in the Championship or league one matches) and also accept that my idea of what football clubs/players used to be like is definitely rose-tinted/never really was but still closer to reality than the empty shell of a thing the vast majority have bought into.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

image.thumb.png.ffb96dd6ba2429b855ea130598f75248.png


Collin Calder one of the founders & first president of Argentinian club CA Rosario Central in 1889 initially called
Central Argentine Railway Athletic Club who was born & raised in Dingwall before emigrating. Calder was employed by Central Argentinian Railway (Ferrocarril Central Argentino) who'se employees were the sole members of the club before opened up to non-employees in 1904 & also changing name to the name it has today.

Edited by GNU_Linux
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 16/09/2023 at 22:10, Luddite said:

Do you watch with a level of cognitive dissonance (as described by Gary Imlach above)?

Aye, and as you say, I feel quite disconnected to the 'product' on offer. I attend out of habit, to get out the house, and have a drink and a laugh. I show as much interest in the 90 minutes of a game as Glenn Middleton.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dundee Hibernian said:

Aye, and as you say, I feel quite disconnected to the 'product' on offer. I attend out of habit, to get out the house, and have a drink and a laugh. I show as much interest in the 90 minutes of a game as Glenn Middleton.

😂👍 I completely understand. They have  us by the balls, feels like something has been stolen from us.  Good luck for this upcoming season, I’m rooting for Arbroath but have always had a soft spot for United so hope they go up too. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


On this day in 1964 Hibs beat Dundee 2-0 in the League Cup Quarter Final Second Leg to win 5-3 on aggregate. The cover of the programme has an action shot, possibly a Hibs goal, from the First Leg played at Dens a week earlier. Bert Slater is the Dundee goalie and George Ryden the no. 5. No idea who the other Dundee player is or the Hibs player. Tiny Wharton is the ref. 23,225 at Dens and 24,375 at Easter Road. Hibs lost in a Semi Final replay to Morton, then in the old Second Division.

 

IMG_1744.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Eednud said:


On this day in 1964 Hibs beat Dundee 2-0 in the League Cup Quarter Final Second Leg to win 5-3 on aggregate. The cover of the programme has an action shot, possibly a Hibs goal, from the First Leg played at Dens a week earlier. Bert Slater is the Dundee goalie and George Ryden the no. 5. No idea who the other Dundee player is or the Hibs player. Tiny Wharton is the ref. 23,225 at Dens and 24,375 at Easter Road. Hibs lost in a Semi Final replay to Morton, then in the old Second Division.

 

IMG_1744.jpeg

I'm not entirely certain but I think the Dundee player is Hammy (Alex Hamilton). Hammy had the distinction of never being on a losing side to England when playing for both the full International team and Scottish League select. 

Edited by ScottyDee1893
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...