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Petty Things That Get On Your Nerves...


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1 hour ago, virginton said:

It was always Shko-da because that's how its actual name - Škoda - is pronounced. That the gammons who have contributed so much to Benidorm's cultural diversity weren't able to grasp that at the time is irrelevant. 

Fun fact: The word 'škoda' means pity or shame, as in when something unfortunate happens to you. Like buying any of their cars from the 1990s. 

I learned to drive in 1997, and was on the look out for a car. My mum came in one day and told me she had found the perfect car for me at a garage in Stirling. Low mileage, no rust, good condition, low price, etc.

She was really excited by this find. We went through to look at it, and arrived at the garage. Mum didn't actually say "Ta-da!" when we got there but just about.

It was a brown Skoda. Not just any brown. What my dad (who came for a look as well) termed "Shit brown". Just a jobby on wheels. Mum and the sales guy were really getting enthusiastic about this car for me. Dad and I exchanged glances but didn't want to burst her bubble. We both knew that we were looking not only at a shite car, but my life as an 18 year old would be at an end if I got this. No girls would ever go out with me if I rode around in this. Bullies at school and university would batter me senseless and it would be well deserved.

We managed to escape with a "we'll have a look at one or two more, but this is the front runner" line. The next week I bought a Vauxhall Nova that lasted 9 months.

Looking online, this is the closest approximation I can find to the car. Imagine this, but a darker brown.

427-11-small.jpg?v=63769043360367

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My dad had a jobby Skoda Favorit at one point. Utterly stinking car, couldn't cringe hard enough anytime I was driven in it. 

This was after an old Triumph Acclaim and was eventually byxthe same model but bottle green.

That ended up replaced by a tiny Perodua that could have been sold as a clown car. Utterly horrendous. 

 

Now that I'm 36 and driving a Dacia Duster, I'm not sure if I've fallen into the same trap. Great car though. 

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My dad had a jobby Skoda Favorit at one point. Utterly stinking car, couldn't cringe hard enough anytime I was driven in it. 
This was after an old Triumph Acclaim and was eventually byxthe same model but bottle green.
That ended up replaced by a tiny Perodua that could have been sold as a clown car. Utterly horrendous. 
 
Now that I'm 36 and driving a Dacia Duster, I'm not sure if I've fallen into the same trap. Great car though. 
I'm 100% sure, as regards the trap.
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16 minutes ago, Stellaboz said:

My dad had a jobby Skoda Favorit at one point. Utterly stinking car, couldn't cringe hard enough anytime I was driven in it. 

This was after an old Triumph Acclaim and was eventually byxthe same model but bottle green.

That ended up replaced by a tiny Perodua that could have been sold as a clown car. Utterly horrendous. 

 

Now that I'm 36 and driving a Dacia Duster, I'm not sure if I've fallen into the same trap. Great car though. 

I, too, drive a Duster. great car. Had it 4 years, no breakdowns, no repairs needed, nothing.

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3 hours ago, Hedgecutter said:

You should go for a walk to calm down.  I certainly would.

Anyway, the German girl I work with gets pissed off with folk here pronouncing Lidl as liddle, rather than leedle as it is in Germany.

Thing is, the Lidl adverts here say liddle on it, maybe simply because "leedle on price" doesn't work and the marketing team are bereft of other ideas.  Such selling-out just riles her even more.

 

Eta: I can be a bit of a pronunciation nazi when it comes to place names.  Moh-ray Firth is probably the one that gets on my tits the most, but central belters on TV saying mal-ay-g rather than mall-ig (when saying Mallaig) is a close second.

There are a few oil fields that were clearly named by folk in London reading mountains / place names off a map, and things like Foyne-aven rather than Foy-na-vin (for Foinaven) are annoyingly too well engrained.  Plenty of other things like this ending up in lectures etc, and I'm guilty of shoehorning in terms just to say them properly.  Nothing petty about ignorance.  

I went for a walk. Went to Cam-ell-on near Falkirk. Apparently it’s Came-ell-on.

Should have went somewhere else. 😃

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Dr said "I have no face to face appointments booked on Friday. If you get here before 4pm I will be able to see you to save you having to tell someone else everything we have spoken about".

Got here at 3:10, she checked me in. I'm still waiting on the shout. :lol:

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7 minutes ago, Mr. Alli said:

Dr said "I have no face to face appointments booked on Friday. If you get here before 4pm I will be able to see you to save you having to tell someone else everything we have spoken about".

Got here at 3:10, she checked me in. I'm still waiting on the shout. :lol:

Don't worry. You'll be on your side soon enough, knees up at your chest and Dr Bigfinger rummaging around looking for clues.

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55 minutes ago, Miguel Sanchez said:

Perhaps one day the modern English language will reach teuchterland and they won't need to get so tetchy about the random letters in their place names.

Milngavie is considered as being part of teuchterland? That's a surprise, even for on here.

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1 hour ago, Joey Jo Jo Junior Shabadoo said:

When I wear it I look like Lorenzo Lamas, and women find it irresistible.

And they think you're Lorenzo Amoroso and are disappointed to find you're Saint Laurence No Tool

(Obscure Irish Saints pun, yup, big team found)

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5 hours ago, Mark Connolly said:

RBS asking me to confirm an online purchase in their online banking app, then once that has been completed, sending a text asking me to confirm the purchase was me, and blocking the card, thus cancelling the purchase, despite me already confirming it.

And being RBS they'll probably charge you for doing it

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People on public transport, staff rooms and other public places watching videos on their phone at full volume.

Have consideration for other people. They dont want to have to listen to it.

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6 hours ago, Mark Connolly said:

RBS asking me to confirm an online purchase in their online banking app, then once that has been completed, sending a text asking me to confirm the purchase was me, and blocking the card, thus cancelling the purchase, despite me already confirming it.

Wish I hadn't downloaded the app now, having to confirm nearly every online purchase, even if it's £3.20 or something.

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